DropFox Campaign Launches

The announcement that Glenn Beck will be leaving Fox News was cause for celebration but also for caution: Advertisers who dropped Beck's show because of his vitriol and deceit should be equally concerned about associating their brands with Fox News, which poses as a news outlet but behaves like a political operation. The DropFox campaign seeks to show advertisers that doing business with Fox will only cost them in the long run, as they run great risk to their reputation by contributing their ad dollars to Fox's political and often toxic agenda.

News Corp Bid to Acquire BSkyB

In June of 2010, News Corp made a move to acquire 61% of British Sky Broadcasting, the largest satellite broadcast company in the UK, which would give it full control over BSkyB. The acquisition process has been slowed by regulatory issues as well as concerns over possible Foxification of news in the UK, and Media Matters launched a campaign in March to encourage British citizens to sign on to a statement to Jeremy Hunt, the secretary of state for culture, ministry and sports.

Since News Corp made its initial bid for BSkyB almost a year ago, the share price has skyrocketed, and the acquisition will now likely cost News Corp $2.5 billion more than the company initially planned to pay for BSkyB.

Groups such as Avaaz.org and 38 Degrees have brought the issue of this takeover into the public arena, focusing on concerns about Rupert Murdoch's "media empire" and potential Foxification of British media.

StopBeck

On July 2, 2009, the StopBeck effort was launched. Along with other campaigns, StopBeck attached a cost to Glenn Beck's reckless vitriol convincing advertisers to cease financially supporting his Fox News show. To date, more than 300 advertisers are boycotting Glenn Beck's show. On April 6, 2011, Fox News announced that they would not be renewing the Glenn Beck Show.